It’s not too late!

Search for drop box locations near you.

You can vote today or up until 7 pm tomorrow at a Voter Service Center near you!

Important notes: 

  • Vote your ballot and drop it off, it’s too late to mail
  • Drop off your ballot before 7 p.m. Tuesday; late ballots will not be counted
  • Find all drop off locations for your county at www.MyColoradoVote.com
  • Check out convenient new 24/hour ballot drop boxers and drive-up drop boxes in some counties

If you don’t have a ballot or made a mistake and need to fill out a new one — even if you’re worried you’re not even registered! — you can visit a Voter Service Center all the way through 7 pm on Election Day to register and fill out a ballot. Find the closest Vote Center to you at www.MyColoradoVote.com.

Must-have for Mobile

Must-have for Mobile

Scads of small type. Truncated graphics. Unusable forms. Browser-crashing incompatibility.

mobile examples

On the right, a site not optimized for mobile — tiny, cut-off text, pics that have to be zoomed-in to see, and tiny, cluttered menu. On the right, clear navigation, mobile-friendly text, and clear calls to action.

On the right, a site not optimized for mobile — tiny, cut-off text, pics that have to be zoomed-in to see, and tiny, cluttered menu. On the right, clear navigation, mobile-friendly text, and clear calls to action.

There are people looking for you — wanting to learn more, wanting to volunteer or even donate to you campaign or cause. And more and more (maybe even up to 50% of the time) they’re using their mobile phones to do it.

Not sure if your web site is mobile-compatible? Don’t feel too terribly bad — turns out some of the major political campaigns are behind the curve, too.

From Politico:

A POLITICO analysis of mobile sites for about 40 competitive House and Senate races found that a majority were plagued with missed opportunities for campaigns trying to find volunteers, donors and voters. The no-nos range from clunky pages that frequently crashed or weren’t formatted properly to content that was just too tiny to read.

Another big problem often discouraged by some political consultants: multiple pages of navigation before a potential donor can hit the send button with their all-important credit card numbers.

Political operatives from both parties say they recognize mobile’s tantalizing possibilities. Still, many campaigns are cutting corners on the mobile front — ignoring pleas for fewer tabs or larger font sizes — even if the potential payoff could mean more votes or thousands of dollars in additional donations. They’re reluctant to shift limited budget dollars away from traditional TV ads, especially for innovations that have a short shelf life limited to this election season.

To digital campaign strategists, seeing the shortcomings on the mobile front makes little sense considering how Americans have come to obsessively use their phones as their primary source not just for daily communication but also for entertainment.

Read full article

Most users don’t want to read lots of text online at all, and even less so on mobile. And most campaigns can’t spring for the coding and development for a full mobile site, custom forms, and the tools required for credit card processing.

That said, if people are looking for you on their phones — and they are — there’s no excuse for making sure they can find you.

The priorities:

  1. Using web analytics, determine what portion of your audience is accessing your site via mobile.
  2. Are there particular times of week or year when mobile usage spikes?
  3. Is there particular content that mobile users access more than desktop users?
  4. Can your donation form be simplified or otherwise optimized for mobile?
  5. Homepage should always be legible in mobile!

All this information inform the urgency and priorities for building out mobile compatibility.

After tackling the minimum, you can further refine your mobile site with custom content for mobile pages (shorter, more tightly-drafted content and photos), custom graphics and features to more closely mimic your desktop-viewable web site, other bells and whistles to integrate with social and other mobile-friendly tools.

Cover photo from Flickr.com/marcoarment

 

Must-Have Mobile Sites

Scads of small type. Truncated graphics. Unusable forms. Browser-crashing incompatibility.

mobile examples

On the right, a site not optimized for mobile — tiny, cut-off text, pics that have to be zoomed-in to see, and tiny, cluttered menu. On the right, clear navigation, mobile-friendly text, and clear calls to action.

There are people looking for you — wanting to learn more, wanting to volunteer or even donate to you campaign or cause. And more and more (maybe even up to 50% of the time) they’re using their mobile phones to do it.

Not sure if your web site is mobile-compatible? Don’t feel too terribly bad — turns out some of the major political campaigns are behind the curve, too.

From Politico:

A POLITICO analysis of mobile sites for about 40 competitive House and Senate races found that a majority were plagued with missed opportunities for campaigns trying to find volunteers, donors and voters. The no-nos range from clunky pages that frequently crashed or weren’t formatted properly to content that was just too tiny to read.

Another big problem often discouraged by some political consultants: multiple pages of navigation before a potential donor can hit the send button with their all-important credit card numbers.

Political operatives from both parties say they recognize mobile’s tantalizing possibilities. Still, many campaigns are cutting corners on the mobile front — ignoring pleas for fewer tabs or larger font sizes — even if the potential payoff could mean more votes or thousands of dollars in additional donations. They’re reluctant to shift limited budget dollars away from traditional TV ads, especially for innovations that have a short shelf life limited to this election season.

To digital campaign strategists, seeing the shortcomings on the mobile front makes little sense considering how Americans have come to obsessively use their phones as their primary source not just for daily communication but also for entertainment.

Read full article.

Most users don’t want to read lots of text online at all, and even less so on mobile. And most campaigns can’t spring for the coding and development for a full mobile site, custom forms, and the tools required for credit card processing.

That said, if people are looking for you on their phones — and they are — there’s no excuse for making sure they can find you.

The priorities:

1. Using web analytics, determine what portion of your audience is accessing your site via mobile.

2. Are there particular times of week or year when mobile usage spikes?

3. Is there particular content that mobile users access more than desktop users?

4. Can your donation form be simplified or otherwise optimized for mobile?

5. Homepage should always be legible in mobile!

All this information inform the urgency and priorities for building out mobile compatibility.

After tackling the minimum, you can further refine your mobile site with custom content for mobile pages (shorter, more tightly-drafted content and photos), custom graphics and features to more closely mimic your desktop-viewable web site, other bells and whistles to integrate with social and other mobile-friendly tools.

cover image from Flickr user /marcoarment

Rise and Shine

The Hickenlooper for Colorado 2014 campaign is up and running! We worked with our friends at Putnam Partners to create a fun new video showing off John Hickenlooper and Joe Garcia’s campaign workout routine as they get ready for 2014.  It was first screened to cheers and laughter at the Democratic Party Assembly on Saturday. From cycling around the state, to meeting thousands of Coloradans, and not to mention answering countless phone calls, all of Team Hickenlooper is busy getting ready for the campaign!

Lynn Bartels mentioned the video in a post on The Spot, and with hundreds of views on YouTube and dozens of shares on Facebook, the video is already launching the campaign into the spotlight with its characteristic positivity, energy, and self-deprecating charm.

ALL the campaign ads?

They call it “The Eye”…

Kantar Media’s Campaign Media Analysis Group — a global PR research and analysis firm — has been collecting campaign ads. And now that they’ve got 10 years worth (upwards of 50,000 ads from the federal, state, and local level), they’ve done something amazing with them.

This stunning (and initially kind of overwhelming) interactive graphic breaks down the ads by party, topic, race, and relative airtime. It’s a stunning piece of datavisualization, and it links to every single one of the ads it has tracked, providing not just a graphical representation of an almost ungraspable amount of data, but an actual live database of the component parts (in this case, each unique ad), as well.

In addition,

Filtered by “President” and “Taxes”.

…beyond enabling binge-viewing of 50,000+ campaign ads, the Eye reflects a thing or two about how political advertising has evolved—even just within the past two presidential races. Not one ad from the 2012 race exceeded the spot count of any of the 10 most-aired ads of 2008. (The most-aired ad of the 2012 race, an Obama ad attacking GOP nominee Mitt Romney for his “47%” remark, actually ranks 12th overall.)

What’s this a reflection of? A smaller battleground in 2012 meant those presidential ads aired across fewer markets, which held down occurrences. But beyond that, the 2012 Obama campaign targeted many of their ads more narrowly, keeping as many as 20 unique commercials on the air at any one time. Many 2012 presidential ads also aired for shorter periods of time than ads in previous races because they were produced to either drive, or take advantage of the news cycle—a growing trend for political ads.

 

It’s about safety

No matter which side of the marijuana legalization issue you’re on, we all recognize the changes made to the Colorado Constitution by Amendment 64 created some unique conflicts between state and federal law – including access to regular banking services. Because marijuana is still a controlled substance under federal law, banks may face criminal and regulatory penalties if they engage with these marijuana businesses.

Ed Perlmutter ran for Congress to be a voice and represent the needs of Colorado, and when he saw this banking conflict arise, he wanted to fix it. That’s why he introduced a bill to allow banks to provide services to marijuana businesses in states with a legal and regulatory structure in place.

It’s simple: legal businesses (including marijuana businesses and banking businesses) should have the freedom to operate just like any other business in the state.

Running a small business is hard enough without the additional challenge of being limited to a cash-only operation. Bottom line: denying entrepreneurs access to banking is a dangerous and costly gamble. It makes shops easy targets for robberies, is a logistical burden for shop owners and employees, and is tremendously inefficient for government offices which end up counting piles of bills when collecting taxes.

It’s time for Congress to take this issue seriously and bring up my bill for a hearing in the House Financial Services Committee. Please sign Ed’s petition, and join him in working towards a common-sense solution to a real public safety problem in Colorado.

Last week, President Obama’s Justice and Treasury departments issued guidance to banks about dealing with changes in states like Colorado and Washington. But that’s not enough. We need a real, permanent solution updating federal law. Many of Ed’s colleagues – Democrats and Republicans – agree and are cosponsoring his bill

Please sign this petition if you want Congress to stop arguing about old ideological battles and start focusing on tackling the everyday problems.